Share |

Content about Law

October 24, 2013
October 22, 2013

A  pillar of the Chickasaw business community, Bill G. Lance, Jr., will bring his expertise to the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma Board of the Regents.

A  pillar of the Chickasaw business community, Bill G. Lance, Jr., will bring his expertise to the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma Board of the Regents.
Gov. Mary Fallin appointed Lance, the administrator and chief executive officer of the Chickasaw Nation Division of Commerce (CNDC), to the board for a seven-year term.
“As a life-long resident of Oklahoma, I am deeply interested in the continued improvement of education and commerce in our great state,” Lance said.

October 22, 2013

Chickasha restaurateur Ed Hicks, a former member of the USAO Board of Regents, died in March. Appointed by Gov. Frank Keating, Hicks served on USAO’s governing board from 1999-2006.

October 16, 2012

April Doshier embodies the call to service that is implicit in the liberal arts mission. A 2002 graduate with a bachelor of science in psychology, Doshier invested her required practicum hours at the Women’s Service and Family Resource Center in Chickasha. A founding member of the Feminist Collective on USAO’s campus, she worked tirelessly to organize campus activities as well as collaborating with the student services staff to make awareness regarding women’s issues and safety part of the Freshman Orientation curriculum.

April Doshier embodies the call to service that is implicit in the liberal arts mission. A 2002 graduate with a bachelor of science in psychology, Doshier invested her required practicum hours at the Women’s Service and Family Resource Center in Chickasha. A founding member of the Feminist Collective on USAO’s campus, she worked tirelessly to organize campus activities as well as collaborating with the student services staff to make awareness regarding women’s issues and safety part of the Freshman Orientation curriculum.

August 11, 2011

As if USAO’s deaf education program wasn’t already completely unique, a $1.2 million cash infusion will only strengthen and further distinguish the only public program of its kind in Oklahoma and the oldest similar degree program west of the Mississippi.

As if USAO’s deaf education program wasn’t already completely unique, a $1.2 million cash infusion will only strengthen and further distinguish the only public program of its kind in Oklahoma and the oldest similar degree program west of the Mississippi.

When deaf education moved into the wholly redesigned Canning Hall in 2009, USAO took another leap forward in the field, welcoming a satellite school from the Oklahoma School for the Deaf (OSD) and crafting a unique partnership to better serve the deaf and students in deaf education.

August 10, 2011

One independent study course offered this May was not just about informing students but also about encouraging them to fight for human rights.

One independent study course offered this May was not just about informing students but also about encouraging them to fight for human rights.

The course focuses on human trafficking, or modern-day slavery of illegally traded human beings for forced labor and sexual exploitation.

August 6, 2011

In an effort to better connect USAO graduates with available employment, the USAO offices of alumni development and career services are teaming up to offer new employment programs.

In an effort to better connect USAO graduates with available employment, the USAO offices of alumni development and career services are teaming up to offer new employment programs.

August 29, 2010

Responding to painful budget cuts with characteristic ingenuity, USAO staff and faculty are imagining new ways to harness available dollars. The school shaved $350,000 a year off its energy bills by creating Oklahoma’s first energy performance contract in higher education back in 2001, but now more state budget cuts are requiring even more imagination.

Responding to painful budget cuts with characteristic ingenuity, USAO staff and faculty are imagining new ways to harness available dollars. The school shaved $350,000 a year off its energy bills by creating Oklahoma’s first energy performance contract in higher education back in 2001, but now more state budget cuts are requiring even more imagination.